Eating Curry Foods Can Help Preserve Brain Health

At Herbsea, we love to eat nutritious and delicious foods from Mother Nature. Many ethnic foods, such as Indian and Asian styles, are abundant with vegetables, fruits and spices that have specific health benefits, and can help keep you lean and fit in the process.

Curry (turmeric) is a spice most people associate with Indian food, but it is also widely used in other Asian nations. And now a new study from UCLA shows that daily consumption of this culinary spice can help actually improve memory and mood in people who have mild age-related memory loss.

The double-blind, placebo-controlled study (published online January 19 in the American Journal of Geriatric Psychiatry), examined the effects of a curcumin supplement on memory performance in people without dementia, and its potential impact on the microscopic plaques and tangles in the brains of those with Alzheimer’s.

Curcumin is the active ingredient with dozens of human clinical trials demonstrating its ability to positively influence inflammation response and in joint comfort and enhanced mobility. Interestingly, some studies have suggested that there is a lower prevalence of Alzheimer’s disease and other cognitive performance impairments in India’s senior citizens. In the brain, “Exactly how curcumin exerts its effects is not certain, but it may be due to its ability to reduce brain inflammation, which has been linked to both Alzheimer’s disease and major depression,” said co-author Dr. Gary Small, director of geriatric psychiatry at UCLA’s Longevity Center and of the geriatric psychiatry division at the Semel Institute for Neuroscience and Human Behavior at UCLA.

The new double-blind, placebo-controlled study involved 40 adults between 50 and 90 years old who had mild memory complaints who took either placebo or 90 milligrams of curcumin twice daily for 18 months. All 40 subjects received standardized cognitive assessments at the start of the study and at six-month intervals, and monitoring of curcumin levels in their blood at the start of the study and after 18 months. Thirty of the volunteers underwent positron emission tomography, or PET scans, to determine the levels of amyloid and tau in their brains at the start of the study and after 18 months.

According to the researchers, at the end of the study those who took curcumin experienced significant improvements in their memory and attention abilities; there were no improvements noted in the placebo group. In memory tests, the curcumin group improved by 28 percent over the 18 months, reported mild improvements in mood, and their brain PET scans showed significantly less amyloid and tau signals in the amygdala and hypothalamus than the placebo group. The amygdala and hypothalamus control several memory and emotional functions. “These results suggest that taking this relatively safe form of curcumin could provide meaningful cognitive benefits over the years,” said Small.

He added that he and his team plan to conduct a follow-up study with a larger number of people. That study will include some people with mild depression so the scientists can explore whether curcumin also has mood-support effects.
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Celebrate National Grapefruit Month

We admit it – we love national months, weeks and days that celebrate something from Mother Nature’s vast pantry – natural, whole foods. This month is National Grapefruit Month – this citrus is often overlooked as a nutrient-packed – and culinary – food. Its cousin, the orange, gets the spotlight for immune-boosting. But the mighty grapefruit is more than just a source of vitamin C.

Your farmers market and supermarket will likely carry the key types – ruby reds, pomelo, marsh and oroblanco. Their flesh is white, pink or red, and can taste tart or sweet when ripe.

vitamins C and A, grapefruits also pack in the potassium.  They contain no cholesterol or sodium and only 52 calories per serving. Pink and ruby red grapefruits also contain the carotenoid lycopene.

Did you know? The leaders in cranberry foods and beverages, Ocean Spray, also specializes in grapefruits; its website has great information as well as numerous recipes (including a grapefruit face mask). And, it notes the following facts about the “delish-nutrish” citrus juice: “Grapefruit juice is one of the lowest calorie and nutrient-dense juice choices; one glass of grapefruit juice is fat-free and cholesterol-free, part of a healthy diet; and each glass of 100% grapefruit juice gives your body a full serving of fruit – and no added sugar.”

Further, according to several sources, half a typical grapefruit provides approximately 60 to 80% daily value of vitamin C (depending on size).

According to several sources, grapefruits provide several key body benefits:

Metabolism boost: compounds in the grapefruit appear to increase adenosine triphosphate (ATP), the energy currency of cells, which speeds up sluggish metabolism.

Blood sugar response-friendly: although grapefruits have a touch of sweetness, they are a low-glycemic index citrus; half a grapefruit contains approximately 8 grams of natural sugar and has low impact on blood sugar.

Cholesterol management: pectin found in grapefruit is a soluble fiber that has been shown in some studies to decelerate progression of atherosclerosis. A human study showed that individuals who drank red grapefruit juice daily for one month had lowered total cholesterol by 15.5%; those who drank white grapefruit juice had only 7.6% lower total cholesterol. Both juices lowered LDL cholesterol. Those in the red grapefruit juice group also had lowered LDL by 20.3%, while the white grapefruit juice group had 10.7% lowering; triglycerides dropped in the red grapefruit juice group by 17.2% while the white grapefruit juice group showed 5.6% lowered triglyceride level.

So, celebrate National Grapefruit Month by adding it to your daily diet – either as a food, or as a glass of refreshing juice. And don’t forget to take your potent plant multi – Fucosea – as your daily starter!

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Study: Diet Affects Mood and Mental Health

While it may seem a no-brainer, a research team at Binghamton University, State University of New York demonstrated that ingestion of certain foods can have an effect on mental wellness, and that those effects differ between younger and older adults.

The researchers conducted an anonymous internet survey asking respondents to complete the Food-Mood Questionnaire (FMQ), which includes questions on food groups that have been associated with neurochemistry and neurobiology.

Analyzing the data, Lina Begdache, assistant professor of health and wellness studies at Binghamton University and Nasim Sabounchi, Assistant Professor of Systems Science and Industrial Engineering, found that mood in young adults (18-29) seems to be dependent on food (primarily meat) that increases availability of neurotransmitter precursors and concentrations in the brain. However, mood in mature adults (over 30 years) may be more reliant on food (fruits) that increases availability of antioxidants and abstinence of food that inappropriately activates the sympathetic nervous system (coffee, high glycemic index and skipping breakfast).

“One of the major findings of this paper is that diet and dietary practices differentially affect mental health in young adults versus mature adults,” said Begdache. “Another noteworthy finding is that young adult mood appears to be sensitive to the buildup of brain chemicals. Regular consumption of meat leads to the buildup of two brain chemicals (serotonin and dopamine) known to promote mood. Regular exercise leads to buildup of these and other neurotransmitters as well. In other words, young adults who ate meat (red or white) less than three times a week and exercised less than three times week showed a significant mental distress.”

She continued, “Conversely, mature adult mood seems to be more sensitive to regular consumption of sources of antioxidants and abstinence of food that inappropriately activates the innate fight-or-flight response (commonly known as the stress response). With aging, there is an increase in free radical formation (oxidants), so our need for antioxidants increases. Free radicals cause disturbances in the brain, which increases the risk for mental distress. Also, our ability to regulate stress decreases, so if we consume food that activates the stress response (such as coffee and too many carbohydrates), we are more likely to experience mental distress.”

At Herbsea, we believe that a healthy diet creates healthy balance, no matter your age. This study shows that certain wholesome foods in certain life stages may have specific actions in supporting mood wellness. Taking a whole-foods supplement, such as Fucosea, also enhances overall feelings of vitality for an active lifestyle.

Begdache, et al. “Assessment of dietary factors, dietary practices and exercise on mental distress in young adults versus matured adults: A cross-sectional study” Nutritional Neuroscience. Published online December 11 2017 doi:10.1080/1028415X.2017.1411875

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Sleep for Better Heart Health

February is national Heart Health Awareness Month (also National Heart Health), and the top non-profit authority on heart health, American Heart Association (www.heart.org), suggests focusing on quality, healthy sleep to support your heart. Are you one of three adults who obtain less than the recommended hours – seven to nine — of sleep?

Burning the candle at both ends – living with a constantly overflowing plate of responsibilities and projects, can be detrimental to heart health. When you allow yourself to sleep for seven or so hours, you can be more productive during the day, and also prevent the groggy, foggy feeling that sleep deprivation brings.

Poor sleep, not enough sleep can contribute to high blood pressure, high blood sugar, heart disease and stroke.

One newer factor that keeps many people from catching their healthy 40 winks – is technology. Many of us are too connected and afraid not to be – smartphones are now a part of us, attached by an unseen umbilical cord.

Changing tech habits can help lessen your dependence and also promote longer, healthier sleep. Charge your smartphone in another room, not next to your bed. It’s too easy to simply reach over and check it. This disrupts sleep, and every time you do this your body feels the need to “start over.” If you still feel the need to charge the phone in the bedroom, minimize disruption by setting the “do not disturb” function to block notifications, and, for the hardcore smartphone addicts, an app-blocking app. Yup; this app blocks your ability to use other apps after a time that you set it for.

In the evenings, dim the light, as the brighter the light the more your melatonin production – circadian rhythm – may be disrupted.

Set a time to go to bed and stick to it; just as you have a wake-up time, say, 6:00 am, your bed time should be 10:30 – add an extra half hour to unwind.

Of course, moderate exercise, healthy diet (full of antioxidants, fiber, protein, good fats and slow carbs), plus a dietary supplement, such as Fucosea that provides optimum nutrients daily, will also help you to obtain a healthy night’s sleep.

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Omega-3s: Nature’s Brain-Boosting Food

A new study in Scientific Reports (a sister journal to Nature) showed that eating fish regularly, each week, can support higher IQ and promote healthier sleep. Regular fish consumption has also been shown to improve cognitive function. This new study is the first to show all three benefits of a high-fish (omega 3) diet. This study found that children who eat fish at least once a week achieved better sleep, have IQ scores that are four points higher on average than those children who didn’t eat as much fish or no fish at all.

Previous studies showed a relationship between omega-3s, the fatty acids in many types of fish, and boosting of intelligence and sleep quality, independently, but not in one trial. This new research reveals sleep as a possible mediating pathway, the potentially previously unidentified connection between fish consumption and intelligence.

“This area of research is not well-developed. It’s emerging,” said Jianghong Liu, lead author on the paper and an associate professor of nursing and public health. “Here we look at omega-3s coming from our food instead of from supplements.”

For the work, a cohort of 541 children aged nine to 11 completed a questionnaire about how often they consumed fish in the past month, with options ranging from “never” to “at least once per week.” They also took an IQ test called the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Revised, which examines verbal and non-verbal skills such as vocabulary and coding.

The team discerned sleep quality using the standardized Children Sleep Habits Questionnaire, addresses sleep duration and frequency of night waking or daytime sleepiness.
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The researchers found that children who ate fish weekly scored 4.8 points higher on the IQ exams than those who said they “seldom” or “never” consumed fish. In addition, increased fish consumption was associated with fewer disturbances of sleep, which the researchers say indicates better overall sleep quality.

“Lack of sleep is associated with antisocial behavior; poor cognition is associated with antisocial behavior,” said co-author Adrian Raine. “We have found that omega-3 supplements reduce antisocial behavior, so it’s not too surprising that fish is behind this.”

We at Herbsea always believe that a healthy diet is the cornerstone of good health, fitness and well-being. There is tremendous evidence that adding fish on a regular basis supports sound health. In tandem, taking supplements such as Fucosea (abundant in vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and omega-3 EFAs) boosts optimal nutrition the body appreciates.

Jianghong Liu, et al. ”The mediating role of sleep in the fish consumption – cognitive functioning relationship: a cohort study.” Scientific Reports, 2017; 7 (1) DOI: 10.1038/s41598-017-17520-w

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Something to Smile About: Oral Health Means Overall Health

Brush and floss at least once a day – you hear this mantra from your dentist. Not many people follow this advice. In fact, according to 2014 survey results from Delta Dental (“Delta Dental Oral Health and Well-Being Survey”) and cited by the American Dental Association (ADA), about seven out of 10 Americans brush their teeth at least twice a day, so more than 30 percent aren’t brushing enough. Additionally, only four out of 10 floss at least once a day while 20 percent never floss; the survey also showed that there was a positive relationship between daily flossing and good oral health.

But there’s another really strong reason to ensure you brush and floss daily, beyond sporting a winning smile: poor oral health leads to overgrowth of bacteria residing in the mouth and that have been linked to oral cancer, colorectal cancer and diabetes. It has been known for several years now that poor oral hygiene also leads to heart disease.

Now, new research published in Cancer Research has added another potentially fatal development from poor oral hygiene: bacteria may also increase risk of developing esophageal cancer.

In the study, researchers took samples of oral bacteria found in more than 120,000 people and ran a DNA analysis to identify all the species that were there. Then, over a 10-year period, they waited to see if anyone would get esophageal cancer; 106 people eventually did.

A few types of bacteria seemed to be more strongly linked with higher or lower risks of esophageal cancer, the authors found. People who had higher levels of Tannerella forsythia and Porphyromonas gingivalis had a higher risk of cancer. Specifically, Tannerella was linked with a 21 percent increased risk; other researchers had previously found high levels of Porphyromonas in esophageal tumors. However, the study did not show a direct causative or mechanistic link between these bacteria and esophageal cancer. These bacteria can cause gum disease and although the findings seem indicative of their presence as a risk factor, that has yet to be determined, the researchers say.

Esophageal cancer is not that common; only about one percent of all cancers diagnosed each year is in the esophagus. And according to the American Cancer Society, those who do get it tend to have a grim outlook – less than one in five people with esophageal cancer survive more than five years after diagnosis.

We at Herbsea believe in promoting healthy habits, and these include not smoking, which is another risk factor for esophageal cancer. Taking supplements rich in antioxidants, such as Fucosea, is also a good habit – along with brushing and flossing daily!

Peters, et al. “Oral Microbiome Composition Reflects Prospective Risk for Esophageal Cancers” Cancer Research 2017 Dec. DOI: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-17-1296

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Milk Alternatives May Cause Iodine Deficiency

Consumers of milk-alternatives may be at of risk iodine deficiency, according to the findings of a new study in the British Journal of Nutrition.

Researchers examined the iodine content of 47 milk-alternative drinks (eg, soy, almond, coconut, oat, rice, hazelnut and hemp) and compared it with that of cows’ milk. Through the analysis they found that

the majority of milk-alternative drinks did not contain adequate levels of iodine; concentration levels were found to be approximately 2% of that found in bovine milk.

Iodine is required by the body to make thyroid hormones; it is also important during pregnancy as iodine is essential for normal fetal brain development. Previous research has shown that low iodine status in pregnant women is linked to lower IQ and reading scores in their children up to nine years old

Margaret Rayman, Professor of Nutritional Medicine at the University of Surrey, said: “Many people are unaware of the need for this vital dietary mineral and it is important that people who consume milk-alternative drinks realize that they will not be replacing the iodine from cows’ milk. This is particularly important for pregnant women and those planning a pregnancy. A glass of a milk-alternative drink would only provide around 2 mcg of iodine which is a very small proportion of the adult recommended iodine intake of 150 mcg/day. In pregnancy, that recommendation goes up to 200 mcg/day.”

Dr Sarah Bath, Lecturer in Public Health Nutrition at the University of Surrey and registered dietitian, said: “Milk-alternative drinks are increasingly being used as a replacement for cows’ milk for a number of reasons that obviously include allergy or intolerance to cows’ milk. Worryingly, most milk-alternative drinks are not fortified with iodine and their iodine content is very low. If avoiding milk and dairy products, consumers need to ensure that they have iodine from other dietary sources, where possible.”

A strong source of iodine is seaweeds. Our Fucosea features kelp, bladderwrack, wakame, mozuku, and the algae Heamatococcus pluvialis, and spirulina,

Bath, et al. “Iodine concentration of milk-alternative drinks available in the UK in comparison with cows’ milk.” British Journal of Nutrition, 2017; 1 DOI: 10.1017/S0007114517002136

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Happy New Year: Make and Keep Resolutions

It happens every year – the end of one and the dawn of another about to happen. New Year. And, most of us take the time to reflect because we all want “a better year,” – those who have had bad ones and even those who have had pretty good ones. It is human nature to want “better” and “more.”

We all know about new year’s resolutions – setting those goals to ensure that the new year coming is indeed better. For example, according to the International Health, Racquet, and Sportsclub Association, more than 12 percent of gym members join n January compared to an average of 8.3% per month for the remainder of the year. “Losing weight and getting into shape” is often the top resolution people have for the upcoming new year.

And many fail. Also consider another top resolution: smokers who aim to quit the habit. According to www.whyquit.com, 16 out of 17 (or 92.6%) smokers fail in keeping this resolution.

Remember: the success of sticking to any resolution or goal (doesn’t matter which synonym you use) is that it is reasonably achievable. For example: if you are 30 pounds overweight and want to lose it all in January, you may likely fail. If your goal is to lose 30 pounds in six months, that is much more likely to be achieved through healthy diet and exercise.

Our friends at www.inverse.com have composed a list of healthier habits that are easy to incorporate.

Drink more water and less soda and alcohol. Water is the key hydrating agent, good for everything. And when you are thirsty, water is truly the only liquid agent that satisfies thirst. It has no calories, nothing added and can lessen appetite by filling your stomach. The recommended amount is eight glasses a day – you may want to work up to this. Don’t just go from one glass to eight, that is too drastic a change for it to become habit. Also, when you feel peckish (a bit hungry), drink water along with something healthy such as a handful of nuts or seeds.

Soda (including zero-calorie/diet) contain ingredients that may promote obesity and blood sugar insufficiency (potentially diabetes type 2). Alcohol can be damaging if not kept in moderation; and the outcome of one study showed that regular alcohol consumption may contribute to cognitive decline.

Exercise your way. If you don’t exercise at all, just start slowly. Walking is your best bet to begin with. And you don’t need to join a gym – although you may want to work up to that. When going shopping, park farther away so you walk more. Walking is good for the heart, lungs, as well as your musculoskeletal system.

Keep your stress in check. If you can, try to attain more sleep – about eight hours. This is the time when your body can repair and restore, and by virtue of better sleep, your ability to withstand stress is improved. Several surveys over the past few years have shown that more and more Americans say they are feeling overwhelmed and stressed out. Review what your priorities are – and cut out what you may not need. Learn to say “no” to requests that may take too much out of you and that are not necessary for you to be involved in. Build “time-out” days to relax or do things you may have been putting off for yourself – such as a spa day, or reading a book on the hammock.

We at Herbsea wish for you a very happy, healthy and prosperous New Year!

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Bone Health Affects Metabolism

A new study has shown a compelling link between bone health and metabolic health and appetite: osteocalcin.

In a recent paper in The Journal of Clinical Investigation, researchers found a new enzyme that guides how osteocalcin works. And, according to the team, this discovery may eventually lead to new ways of preventing or delaying development of type 2 diabetes and obesity. Osteocalcin is produced by bone cells and it helps metabolize sugar.

Study co-author Mathieu Ferron, director of the Montreal Clinical Research Institute’s Integrative and Molecular Physiology Research Unit, explained that one of osteocalcin’s functions is to increase insulin production, which in turn reduces blood glucose levels.” It can also protect us from obesity by increasing energy expenditure.”

Osteocalcin is produced by osteoblasts, the cells that build bone tissue (osteoclasts break down bone tissue). The hormone builds up in bone, and then, through a series of chemical reactions, is released into the blood. Osteocalcin is in its inactive form when it is first produced in osteoblasts. “What interested us was understanding how osteocalcin becomes active so as to be able to play its role when released into the blood,” Ferron said.

The researchers demonstrated that an enzyme, furin, is required. Inactive osteocalcin has one more element than active osteocalcin. In mice, the researchers examined the different enzymes present in cells where osteocalcin was produced that could be responsible for the cleaving action.

Ferron’s team found that furin causes osteocalcin to become active and the hormone is then released into the blood. “We demonstrated that when there was no furin in bone cells, inactive osteocalcin built up and was still released, but this led to an increase in blood glucose levels and a reduction in energy expenditure and insulin production,” he said.

In addition, deleting furin seemed to reduce the mice’s appetites. “We’re confident that the absence of furin was the cause,” Ferron said.

Indeed, his team demonstrated that osteocalcin itself has no effect on appetite. “Our results suggest the existence of a new bone hormone that controls food intake,” Ferron said.

At Herbsea, we continue to encourage eating a healthy diet, supplementing with quality products such as Fucosea, and engaging in regular exercise, all contribute greatly to ensuring a lowered risk of obesity and related development of diabetes type II.

Al Rifai, et al.”Proprotein convertase furin regulates osteocalcin and bone endocrine function Journal of Clinical Investigation, 2017; 127 (11): 4104 DOI: 10.1172/JCI93437

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It’s Flu Season!

Tis the season to be sneezin’ – and the US Centers for Disease Control (CDC) has some interesting predictions. We are presenting the info here so you can protect yourself and your family, friends and co-workers.

Each year before flu season begins, a vaccine is made based on the virus strains that research suggests are expected to circulate.

During the 2015-16 season, vaccine effectiveness was 47%, according to the CDC. While the overall effectiveness of last season’s vaccine was 42%, it was only 34% effective against the H3N2 viruses that dominated the season. Still, it is worthwhile to get your flu vaccine because there are no downsides. Those people who have asserted that they “still got the flu” were likely already compromised before they got the shot up until two weeks after (this is about the time it takes for the body to develop its immunity in this instance).

The CDC reports that the most common reaction to the flu shot in adults has been soreness, redness or swelling at the spot where the shot was given. This usually lasts less than two days. This initial soreness is most likely the result of the body’s early immune response reacting to a foreign substance entering the body. Other reactions following the flu shot are usually mild and can include a low grade fever and aches. If these reactions occur, they usually begin soon after the shot and last 1-2 days. The most common reactions people have to flu vaccine are considerably less severe than the symptoms caused by actual flu illness.

The CDC recommends that the following individuals obtain a flu shot or vaccine (most drug stores and healthcare began these by late October):

  • all persons aged 50 and older;
  • adults and children who have chronic pulmonary (including asthma) or cardiovascular (except isolated hypertension), renal, hepatic, neurologic, hematologic, or metabolic disorders (including diabetes mellitus);
  • persons who are immunocompromised due to any cause (including immunosuppression caused by medications, for example);
  • women who are or will be pregnant during the influenza season;
  • children and adolescents (aged 6 months through 18 years) who take aspirin- or salicylate-containing medications;
  • residents of nursing homes and other long-term care facilities;
  • persons who are extremely obese (BMI ≥40).

Eat a healthy, antioxidant-rich diet that is also low in foods that increase inflammation. Drink alcohol sparingly, but lots of water. Ensure you try to sleep for six to eight hours. Wash your hands frequently and if you are not near soap and water, use antibacterial gel. And of course, take supplements with optimal amounts of micronutrients, fiber and omega 3 EFAs; our Fucosea is a great example as a foundation to help keep you well during the winter season.

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